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    CPSA Students Caucus Meeting








    Congrès annuel de l'ACSP 2019 - 4 juin 2019
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    Workshop: The Official Languages Act at 50
    Le 50e anniversaire de la Loi sur les langues officielles








    Congrès annuel de l'ACSP 2019 - 4 juin 2019
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    Reception: Department of Political Science
    University of British Columbia








    Congrès annuel de l'ACSP 2019 - 4 juin 2019
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    Association canadienne de science politique
    Programme du congrès annuel de l'ACSP 2019

    LA POLITIQUE AUTREMENT;
    PARLER FRANC, PARLER VRAI

    Organisé à l'Université de la Colombie-Britannique
    Mardi le 4 juin 2019 au jeudi 6 juin 2019
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    Discours présidentiel
    François Rocher, CPSA President

    Vie et mort d’un enjeu
    la science politique canadienne
    et la politique québécoise

    Location: CIRS 1250
    Mardi le 4 juin 2019 | 17 h 00 - 18 h 00
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    Keynote: UBCIC Grand
    Chief Stewart Phillip

    Asserting Indigenous
    Title and Rights in 2019

    Location: CIRS 1250
    Mardi le 4 juin 2019 | 10 h 30 - 12 h 00
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    Keynote Speaker: Wendy Brown
    In the Ruins of Neoliberalism:
    Our Predicaments:
    the Rise of Anti-democratic
    Politics in the West

    Location: CIRS 1250
    Mercredi le 5 juin 2019 | 14 h 00 - 15 h 30
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    Keynote Speaker: Roland Paris
    Canada Alone?
    Surviving in a Meaner World

    Location: CIRS 1250
    Jeudi le 6 juin 2019 | 10 h 30 - 12 h 00

Politique locale et urbaine



E07 - Micro-paper Roundtable: ‘Creatures of Provinces’ or Local Democracies? Exploring the Place of Municipalities in Canada’s Democracy in Light of the Doug Ford Government’s Interference in Toronto’s Municipal Election

Date: Jun 4 | Heure: 03:15pm to 04:45pm | Location: SWING 407

Chair/Président/Présidente : Kristin Good (Dalhousie University)

‘Creatures of Provinces’ or Local Democracies? Exploring the Place of Municipalities in Canada’s Democracy in Light of the Doug Ford Government’s Interference in Toronto’s Municipal Election:

Kristin Good (Dalhousie University)
Warren Magnusson (University of Victoria)
Caroline Andrew (University of Ottawa)
Jack Lucas (University of Calgary)
Martin Horak (Western University)
Matthew Kellway (York University )
Kate Graham (University of Western Ontario )

Abstract: Municipalities are often dismissed as ‘creature of provinces’ in Canada because they lack independent constitutional status; formally, municipal institutions are an exclusive area of provincial responsibility under section 92.8 of the written constitution. However, a great deal has changed in the country and its democratic institutions, practices and constitution since this element of Canada’s written constitution was entrenched in 1867. Canada has been transformed from a largely rural country with colonial ties to Britain into an independent, largely urban and multicultural federation with universal suffrage for citizens. Constitutionally, we have witnessed fundamental changes to the written constitution including the entrenchment of amending formulae, the Charter of Rights and Freedoms, Aboriginal rights as well as significant constitutional shifts in federalism and rights through judicial interpretation. In the context of the evolution of the country and the constitution, what is and ought to be the place of municipal governments in Canada’s multilevel democratic system? The roundtable begins with the case of the Doug Ford government’s interference in the Toronto municipal election 2018 as an example of the way in which the constitutional doctrine of ‘creatures of provinces’ influences provincial policy, judicial review, and ultimately also citizen engagement, at the expense of the principle of local democracy. Participants critically explore the constitutional doctrine of ‘creatures of provinces,’ the purpose of municipalities as governments, the importance of municipalities as policymakers and offer ideas concerning how we might best realize the principle of local democracy in Canada.




Acceuil